Arm and Leg Swelling in Babies

Infants, Babies, Toddlers, Teens with Lymphedema, lymphedema chronic arthritis, pediatric lymphedema, debulking surgery children, arm and leg swelling in babies, daily care

Moderators: Birdwatcher, jenjay, Cassie, patoco, Senior Moderators

Arm and Leg Swelling in Babies

Postby patoco » Fri Jun 09, 2006 7:09 pm

Arm and Leg Swelling in Babies

-------------------------------------------------

Home page: Lymphedema People

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com

-------------------------------------------------

Arm and Leg Swelling in Babies

The problem and questions begin when you discover that your beautiful new little baby has arms or legs that swell for no apparent reason. You take your baby to the doctors...one after another and all they seem to be able to do is shake their head and say "I don't know!"

What do you turn? What do you do next? How in the world can you get some help? Here is some information that may help.

Related Terms:

Edema, Oedema, Fluid Retention, Water Retention, Swollen Leg, Swollen Arm, Lymphedema, Lymphoedema

Swelling

Swelling is simply defined as the enlargement of an effected body part, generally arm or leg as a result of fluid rentention. It may also effect the skin, organs, hand, fingers, foot and even toes. The fluid collects because the body is not able to eliminate the excess liquids.

It is not uncommon and has been experienced by many many people. Usually, this swelling is temporary and goes away after the underlying condition is healed.

If it effects a specific area i.e. arm or leg it is referred to a localized edema, if it effects the entire over all body it is referred to as generalized/

Temporary Swelling

This temporary swelling may be caused by an infection, burn or sunburn, insect bites, an injury to the leg such as a sprain, surgery, or even medications such a hormone drugs, steroids, blood pressure drugs, or may be an allergic reaction in which is it referred to as angioedema. This may also be an part of the inflammatory response your body goes through it trying to protect and heal the leg or arm from the cause of the trauma.

Long Term Swelling

Long term swelling is referred to as edema. This is usually related to specific medical conditions. These conditions may include diabetes, congestive heart failure, blood clot, varicose veins, kidney failure, liver failure or a number of cardio-vascular problems.

Treatment for this long term swelling is in conjunction with the treatment for the condition that caused it. Usually diuretics are also used to relieve the swelling or water-retention.

Permanent Leg or Arm Swelling

****In the situation of any permanent leg swelling whether the cause is known or unknown, the diagnoses of lymphedema must be considered****

There are several groups of people who experience leg or arm swelling from known causes, but it doesn't go away or unknown causes where the swelling can actually get worse as time goes by.

Group One

This group includes those who have had the injuries, infections, insect bites, trauma to the leg, surgeries or reaction to a medication. When this swelling does not go away, and becomes permanent it is called secondary lymphedema.

Group Two

Another extremely large group that experiences permanent leg or arm swelling are cancer patients, people who are morbidly obese, or those with the condition called lepedema. What causes the swelling to remain permanent is that the lymph system has been so damaged that it can no longer operate normally in removing the body's waste fluid.

In cancer patients this is the result of either removal of the lymph nodes for cancer biopsy, radiation damage to the lymph system, or damage from tumor/cancer surgeries.

This is also referred to as secondary lymphedema.

Group Three

Group three consists of people who have leg or arm swelling from seemingly unknown reasons. There may be no injury, no cancer, no trauma, but for some reason the leg simply is swollen all the time.

The swelling may start at birth, it may begin at puberty, or may begin in the 3rd, 4th or even 5th decade of life or sometimes later.

This type of leg or arm swelling is called primary lymphedema. It can be caused by a genetic defect, malformation or damage to the lymph system while in the womb or at birth or be part of another birth condition that also effects the lymph system.

This is an extremely serious medical condition that must be diagnosed early, and treated quickly so as to avoid painful, debilitating and even life threatening complications. Treatment should NOT include the use of diuretics.

What is Lymphedema?

Lymphedema is defined simply as an accumulation of excessive protein rich fluid in the tissues of the leg. The accumulation of fluid causes the permanent swelling caused by a defective lymph system.

A conservative estimate is that there may be 1-2 million people in the United States with some form of primary lymphedema and two to three million with secondary lymphedema.

What are the symptoms of Lymphedema?

If you are an at risk person for arm lymphedema there are early warning signs you should be aware of. If you experience any or several of these symptoms, you should immediately make your physician aware of them.

1.) Unexplained aching, hurting or pain in the arm

2.) Experiencing "fleeting lymphedema." This is where the limb may swell, even slightly, then return to normal. This may be a precursor to full blown arm lymphedema.

3.) Localized swelling of any area. Sometimes lymphedema may start as swelling in one area, for example the hand, or between the elbow and hand. This is an indication of early lymphatic malfunction.

4.) Any arm inflammation, redness or infection.

5.) You may experience a feeling of tightness, heaviness or weakness of the arm.

How is Lymphedema Treated?

The preferred treatment today is decongestive therapy. The forms of therapy are complete decongestive therapy (CDT) or manual decongestive therapy (MDT), there are variances, but most involve these two type of treatment.

It is a form of massage therapy where the leg is very gently massaged to actually move the fluid out of the leg and into an area where the lymph system still functions normally.

With these massage treatments, swelling is reduced and then the patient is fitted with a pre-measured custom pressure garment to keep the swelling down and/or is taught to use compression wraps to maintain the leg size.

What are some of the complications of lymphedema?

1. Infections such as cellulitis, lymphangitis, erysipelas. This is due not only to the large accumulation of fluid, but it is well documented that lymphodemous limbs are localized immuno-deficient.

2. Draining wounds that leak lymphorrea which is very caustic to surrounding skin tissue and acts as a port of entry for infections.

3. Increased pain as a result of the compression of nerves usually caused by the development of fibrosis and increased build up of fluids.

4. Loss of Function due to the swelling and limb changes.

5. Depression - Psychological coping as a result of the disfigurement and debilitating effect of lymphedema.

6. Deep venous thrombosis again as a result of the pressure of the swelling and fibrosis against the vascular system. Also, can happen as a result of cellulitis, lymphangitis and infections.

7. Sepsis, Gangrene are possibilities as a result of the infections.

8. Possible amputation of the limb.

9. Pleural effusions may result if the lymphatics in the abdomen or chest are to overwhelmed to clear the lung cavity of fluids.

10. Skin complications such as splitting, plaques, susceptibility to fungus and bacterial infections.

11. Chronic localized inflammations.

Can lymphedema be cured?

No, at the present time there is no cure for lymphedema. But it can be treated and managed and most of the complications can be avoided. Life with lymphedema can still be active and full, with proper treatment, patient education, and patient life style adaptation.

For extensive information on lymphedema, please visit our home page:

Lymphedema People

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com

For more extensive info on children's lymphedema:

Children's and Pediatric Lymphedema

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/thesite ... iatric.htm

(c) Copyright 2005 by Pat O'Connor and Lymphedema People
User avatar
patoco
Site Admin
 
Posts: 2175
Joined: Thu Jun 08, 2006 9:07 pm

New Grandbaby

Postby Jimmie » Wed Sep 06, 2006 1:29 pm

Hi,
My name is Kathleen and this is my story. My son and daughter in law gave birth to a healthy baby boy on August 24. He weighed 7lbs 9oz. He was put in a baby bed while he was being checked by the attending RN's. I noticed that his little feet were swollen and red in color, with all of the excitement of finally seeing this little guy after all of these months I focused on the way he looked so much like my son. After a couple of hours and all of the stuff they do after they are born, I asked one of the nurses why were his feet so swollen? she said it was a genetic...something! I then had the attending RN contact the doctor on call to check it out. My son was with my daughter-in-law in the hospital room taking care of her. She had delivered C-section and we were with the baby in the nursery. The Dr. came and spoke with my son in the nursery and said he had never seen a newborn with anything like this and would have to go home a pull out is text books. This is when I knew that I would have to start my own research. I really, did not want to interupt my son and daughter-in-law's moment of the birth of their first baby so I kept it to myself. After, doing research I need the help of everyone out there for what is considered Millroy's Disease.
Thank- You so much and God Bless
Kathleen
Jimmie
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 1:43 pm

Postby patoco » Wed Sep 06, 2006 1:50 pm

HI Kathleen

A super welcome to our family and am so very glad you found us.

I was born with Milroy's....way back in 1952. It seems doctors haven't progressed much in their understanding of this condition.

Please do come and join us in our Children with Lymphedema group. It is an astounding group with the support, info and encouragement the parents give each other.

Pat
User avatar
patoco
Site Admin
 
Posts: 2175
Joined: Thu Jun 08, 2006 9:07 pm


Return to Children and Lymphedema

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


cron